After Vaccination- 2 page infographic, in downloadable pdf

provided by Mark Nichter, PhD and , HCW Hosted

Here is a pdf of all the information that follows!

Congratulations on getting vaccinated and moving our community one step closer to healthy, but we aren’t quite there yet. Vaccines take time to provide their maximum protection. Here is what you can do now to continue to protect yourself, your loved ones, and your community.

Keep wearing a good fitting mask Keep physical distancing
Keep washing your hands frequently

Get tested! If you feel sick with COVID-like symptoms including cough, shortness- of-breath, runny nose, sore throat, and loss of taste or smell, get tested! Yes, even if you had the vaccine. These are not likely to be vaccine side effects.

Quarantine If you have had a significant COVID-19 exposure Report any side effects through the CDC V-safe project –

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/vsafe.html

1.Vaccines take time to provide protection. A few weeks after the first shot the current vaccines are about 50% effective at preventing COVID-19. Two weeks after the second dose of the vaccine, the effectiveness rate can be as high as 95%.  Being vaccinated can also reduce the severity of illness if you do get COVID-19 disease.

2.Vaccines are good, but not perfect. Even after the second dose, individuals are not 100% protected. That is why it is critical to continue to protect yourself and others using the strategies you already know – wear a mask, stay distanced, and wash your hands.

3.We know the COVID-19 vaccines reduce symptomatic cases and save lives.

What we do not know yet is how well the vaccines reduce disease transmission. Even after being vaccinated, you may still infect others. Continue to practice physical distancing and masking up.

You are likely to experience some side effects. This is normal. It is your body’s immune system reacting to the vaccine and is an indication that the vaccine is working. Approximately 55-83% of individuals develop mild to moderate side effects within the first 3 days post-vaccination. They typically last only one or three days. This is much shorter than the average 2 weeks recovery for mild COVID-19 disease and 6 weeks or more for severe and critical cases.

Rest, hydrate, and move that arm. Plan some downtime after your vaccine. Drink plenty of water, but avoid drinking alcohol before and after doses for a day or two. Alcohol is an immunosuppressant. And move that arm to help spread out the vaccine and reduce arm pain.

The most common side effects are pain in your arm and fatigue, but some people also experience fever, chills, joint, and muscle pain. Side effects are usually stronger and more common after the second dose and in younger people. Plan for a light day if possible, especially after your second dose. They typically last only one or three days; much shorter than COVID-19 recovery.

Do not delay getting the second dose as recommended (best 21 days for Pfizer , 28 days for Moderna but up to 42 days is ok). Delaying the second dose will not reduce side effects and may decrease effectiveness.

Cough, shortness-of-breath, runny nose, sore throat, and loss of taste or smell are not likely to be side effects of the vaccine. If you experience these, get tested for COVID-19.

While most people who would have an anaphylactic reaction would experience it within your 15-minute post-vaccination wait, there are extremely rare instances of the reaction occurring up to two hours later. Be sure to continue monitoring for signs such as rapid heartbeat, throat swelling and seek medical attention or call 911 immediately.

1.While new variants may lead to some reduction in vaccine effectiveness, current evidence suggests that the vaccines still provide significant protection against new variants and everyone who is eligible should get vaccinated as soon as the vaccines are available to them.

2.We do NOT yet know how long the protection from the vaccine lasts. Researchers are currently studying this issue.

Bottom line- Stay vigilant, keep going with the recommended prevention measures until public health authorities change guidance, but have peace of mind that by getting your vaccine, you have substantially reduced your risk of disease!

AZCOVIDTXT

Trabajadores de la salud y el COVID-19: Morbilidad y mortalidad, fuentes de estrés, agotamiento y desgaste (burnout)

Mark Nichter PhD, MPH 1,  Joseph Fong, MPH 2, Collin Catalfamo, MPH 2, Translation Christiana Kasner and Tamara Bassett (Idaho State University)

1 School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, EE.UU.2 Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, EE.UU

El costo de las pandemias en los trabajadores de la salud es significativo dado su duración

•Durante los brotes epidémicos graves, la demanda de trabajadores de la salud crece, incluso cuando las presiones extremas que enfrentan provocan una disminución de la disponibilidad.

•Durante un brote, se espera que los trabajadores de la salud trabajen largas horas bajo una presión significativa con recursos a menudo inadecuados, mientras aceptan los peligros inherentes a la interacción cercana con pacientes enfermos y la fatiga emocional.

•Los trabajadores de la salud, como todos los demás, son vulnerables a la enfermedad y a los rumores y la desinformación/desinformación, especialmente de los líderes políticos, lo que resulta tanto a un aumento en los niveles de ansiedad como a una creciente sensación de angustia moral.

Powerpoint slideshow of all 67 slides in Spanish

PDF of all 67 slides in Spanish

An overview of COVID-19 vaccines, their distribution, and acceptance and hesitation

Mark Nichter, PhD, MPH 1,  Joseph Fong, MPH 2, Collin Catalfamo, MPH 2, Amy Lind 2

1 School of Anthropology, University of Arizona

2 Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona

This is an excellent resource!!!! Thank you Mark, Joseph, Collin and Amy!!!!

The presentation is in two forms:

PDF

Powerpoint:

Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

This blog is written by medical anthropologists and others who are working on issues surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic. It was started in March 2020 and will continue into the future. Many of the posts are short ethnographic pieces that situate the spread of Covid-19 in time and place; updates will follow, reflections are encouraged. This blog also hosts the work of Mark Nichter, PhD and others as they gather the latest and most reliable information available on Covid-19. These posts are available for download as pdfs and powerpoint presentations. 

If you would like to contribute to this blog, please email Liz Cartwright, RN, PhD carteliz@isu.edu 

Social science perspectives are particularly encouraged, let me know if you have an idea for a post! ~ Liz

“Herd Immunity” & Great Barrington Declaration

Why a “targeted protection” approach is not safe or feasible in the United States

Collin Catalfamo, MPH 1,  Mark Nichter, PhD, MPH 2

1 Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health School, University of Arizona

2 School of Anthropology, University of Arizona

WHAT IS THE GREAT BARRINGTON DECLARATION? WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND THIS…….?

•The societal harm that can occur as a byproduct of extended, restrictive lockdowns are very real; however, the Great Barrington Declaration (as well intentioned as it might be) possesses critical flaws.

•It does not advocate mandates such as physical distancing or the wearing of masks, and does not promote testing and tracing

•The focus is on severe cases, not morbidity that may result in long debilitating symptoms that may follow months after a mild infection

THIS STRATEGY IS EXTREMELY DANGEROUS. While it may seem like a simple solution that makes sense, remember, the COVID-19 pandemic is a complex problem and as such will require a complex solution.

For the full explanation of this declaration see the following pdf and powerpoint slideshows put together by these authors. Please feel free to share; do acknowledge the authors and HCW Hosted who supports this work. !

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Health Care Workers and Covid-19

Mark Nichter PhD, MPH 1, Joseph Fong, MPH 2, Collin Catalfamo, MPH 2

1 School of Anthropology, University of Arizona
2 Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona

This slide set covers the major issues facing our health care workforce during the Covid-19 pandemic. Nurses, doctors, and everyone else working in health care facilities is faced with some unique stresses from this disease. Vital to our societies and integral parts of our families, healthcare workers’ needs must be understood in all their complexity. We need to care for our health care workers.

The first downloadable file is a pdf of this slide set, the second downloadable file is a powerpoint presentation. Share widely– authors and affiliations are on the first page. References are found in the “notes” in the POWERPOINT verson.

Image by E. Cartwright

This blog is written by medical anthropologists and others who are working on issues surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic. It was started in March 2020 and will continue into the future. Many of the posts are short ethnographic pieces that situate the spread of Covid-19 in time and place; updates will follow, reflections are encouraged. This blog also hosts the work of Mark Nichter, PhD and others as they gather the latest and most reliable information available on Covid-19. These posts are available for download as pdfs and powerpoint presentations.

If you would like to contribute to this blog, please email Liz Cartwright, RN, PhD carteliz@isu.edu

Social science perspectives are particularly encouraged, let me know if you have an idea for a post! ~ Liz

Health Citizen Pledge

We can get the COVID-19 pandemic under control. But we need to work together to do it. 

We pledge to uphold our part of that commitment and to hold our government officials accountable for upholding theirs. 

SIGN the PLEDGE HERE!

https://www.healthcitizenpledge.org

Who We Are

HCW Hosted is a Tucson-based, non-partisan non-profit dedicated to facilitating community support of healthcare workers and their families during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. 

We are healthcare workers & family members, anthropologists, public health professionals, psychologists, epidemiologists, and general community members. We are committed to serving and supporting the whole frontline healthcare team: nurses, respiratory and radiology technicians, doctors, aides, environmental services workers, hospital social workers, EMTs, medics, case managers, unit clerks, and all the other professions who make frontline healthcare possible.

You can find out more about us or follow us on our websiteFacebookInstagram, and Twitter

If you are a media representative interested in finding out more about HCW Hosted or the Health Citizen Pledge, please contact us at media@hcwhosted.org.

Covid-19 Research Updates

A Primer on COVID-19

The disease
Placing the disease in context
Information backing up present public health measures Practical tips on staying safe
And much more

Updated periodically Mark Nichter PhD, MPH School of Anthropology, University of Arizona Updated 9/42020
Version 11
University of Arizona Assisted by
Collin Catalfamo MPH UA Epidemiology

Youth and Covid-19

Mark Nichter PhD, MPH 1, Collin Catalfamo, MPH 2

1 School of Anthropology, University of Arizona
2 Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona

Overview

  • Early on in the pandemic, and up until more recently, the majority of the data and research has been dedicated to adults and COVID-19.
  • Presently, however, more attention is being paid to the effects COVID-19 has on children, especially in the context of whether children should return to in-person classes.
  • This presentation will cover how COVID-19 affects children and the different aspects that need to be considered when deciding whether in-person instruction return.

Covid primer updates: Arizona, a case study

Photo by Chei ki on Pexels.com

As always, our readers are invited to propose blog topics. Send me an email at carteliz@isu.edu if you would like to contribute!

A Primer on COVID-19:Placing the disease in context

by Mark Nichter, PhD, MPH and Collin Catalfamo, MPH

June 26, 2020. This week’s updates include new information on the rapidly changing distribution of Covid-19 within the US and the world, changing age demographics/spikes in disease numbers, more longitudinal data on the recovery phases and testing issues and more.

Download the pdf and/or powerpoint version of the update here:

Photo by E. Cartwright 2020 “SE Idaho”

Guest blogs and information are welcome. Email me at carteliz@isu.edu if you are interested in contributing information, research ideas or perspectives to the blog.